Dresden Destroyed

April 25, 2015 in 1945, Am, Disaster, Germany, Pictures of War, Posters, WWII



Picture Taken On:
1945


Place:
Dresden, Germany

Behind the Camera:
Richard Peter

Picture Summary:
A statue on the City Hall Rathausturm or Tower overlooks a destroyed Dresden
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On the left Dresden in 1945 by Richard Peter and on the right Dresden in 2005 by Matthias Rietschel (AP)

On the left Dresden in 1945 by Richard Peter and on the right Dresden in 2005 by Matthias Rietschel (AP)

The logic behind the Allied bombing campaigns was that air attacks would force Nazi Germany out of the war. Working to this goal much of occupied Nazi Europe was laid waste by bombers manned by Allied airmen. One of the most controversial bombing raids was the Bombing of Dresden, Germany in World War II. Between February 13 – 15, 1945 over 1200 Allied bombers dropped their deadly pay loads on one of Germany’s biggest cities. After the last bomber flew away the city was left in almost total ruins. It took years to rebuild and in 1945 photographer Richard Peter took this famous picture after scaling the city hall.

The Statue

The statue in the foreground overlooking the ruins of Dresden is often reported to be Peter Poeppelmann’s “Allegory of Goodness” or “Allegorie der Güte” but the statue was actually carved by August Streimueller.

Dresden 1945 and Now

Dresden 1945 and Now

The Bombing Raid

The infamous Bombing of Dresden is still one of the most controversial actions of the Allies during WWII. Between February 13 and 15 1945 around 1,250 heavy bombers of the British and American air-forces dropping huge amounts of explosive and incendiary devices on the mostly wooden city. The resulting firestorm killed around 25,000 people and destroyed most of the historic city center. This happened even though Dresden was of questionable military value.

Richard Peter

Richard Peter was born in Silesia in 1895. While working as a smith and miner he was drafted into the army to serve in the trenches during WW1. After the war he settled in Dresden and became a photojournalist for various left wing publications. When the Nazis came to power he was blacklisted and used his skills with the camera to work in advertising before he was drafted into the German Army during WWII.

After the war he returned to Dresden to find the city totally destroyed including all his photo equipment. Using borrowed equipment he began to document Dresden’s literal rise from the ashes. Publishing his work in a book Dresden, eine kamera klagt an (Dresden, a photographic accusation).

Even with his pre-Nazi left wing credentials his life under the communist regime wasn’t much better. After investigating corrupt communist officials he was banned from government work but continued to make a living as a free lance photographer. He died on October 3, 1977 at the age of 82.


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